COMMERCIAL DRIVE - LIVE!

NEWS ~ GOSSIP ~ FOOD ~ ENTERTAINMENT ~ PEOPLE ~ COFFEE



ALL ABOUT THE MOST VIBRANT,
CULTURALLY DIVERSE NEIGHBOURHOOD IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

A Brief History of Commercial Drive


From Wikipaedia
Photo by Mussels

The Drive was originally a skid road for dragging logs to the harbour. It was named "Park Drive" but renamed "Commercial Drive" in 1911, possibly to avoid confusion with other Park Drives in Vancouver. Commercial Drive ends in the south at 16th Avenue, the former end of Vancouver/start of City of South Vancouver, when it does a diversion to Victoria Drive. A limited light industrial Commercial Street carries on to 22nd Avenue, and around the Selkirk school there, until 54th Avenue as a residential street.

In 1891 the Drive became part of the Vancouver-New Westminster Interurban, a streetcar line. The streetcar line encouraged the growth of local businesses and residences, an influence that is still felt today. The Interurban ceased operation in 1954.

After World War I many Italian immigrants settled in eastern Vancouver, and the northern part of Commercial Drive came to be known as "Little Italy".

Commercial Drive was the center of a prosperous suburb during the 1920s, but declined during the Great Depression and never significantly recovered until World War II. One result of this is a significant number of historical buildings and residences in the area.

During the 1960s, immigration from Asian countries began to dilute the European influence.

In the years around 2000, local outlets of multi-national companies became the target of anti-globalization protesters and civil disobedience campaigns. As of 2005, there are still very few large retail or restaurant chains on Commercial Drive.

In 2002, many restaurant owners were upset with the infamous "dancing police"; bylaw enforcement officers who ticketed establishments hosting any dancing to live music.

In late 2004, Commercial Drive gained national notoriety when the media revealed that several cafes there were openly selling marijuana. The issue has publicised the city's lack of enforcement of Canadian drug laws, and demonstrated a commitment to its stated "Four Pillars" drug strategy.

In early summer 2005, Commercial Drive hosted its first car-free festival, in which 16 blocks were cleared of all vehicles and tens of thousands of people celebrated with walks, dancing, and food.

Take me to the full Wikipaedia entry...

Labels: , ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home